Frequently Asked Questions

PCPC

How do I unpack a font file?

Windows font files are zip file archives. Zip file archives have a file extension of .zip. Recent versions of Windows (XP and 2000) can unpack zip file archives and self-extracting zip files when you right click on the file, and select “Extract”. Otherwise, use software such as WinRAR, WinZip, or FreeZip to unpack these files.


The file I downloaded does not unpack. What do I do?

Make sure you have downloaded the latest version of WinRAR, WinZip or FreeZip.

The file may not have downloaded properly. Try downloading the file again.


Installing OpenType and TrueType fonts in Windows, and PostScript Type 1 fonts in Windows XP and 2000

In versions prior to Windows XP, Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. In Windows XP, choose Start > Control Panel.

Double-click the Fonts folder. If you don't see a Fonts folder in Windows XP, please switch the control panel to Classic Mode

Choose File > Install New Font.

Locate the fonts you want to install. In the Drives list, select the drive and the folder containing the fonts you want to install. In the Folders list, select a folder that contains the fonts you want to install. (Make sure you have unzipped them first.) The fonts in the folder appear under List of Fonts.

Select the fonts to install. To select more than one font, hold down the CTRL key and select each font. To select a list of fonts to install, select the first font in the list, press the SHIFT key, then select the last font in the list. All of the fonts in between will be selected.

To copy the fonts to the Fonts folder, make sure the Copy fonts to the Fonts folder check box is selected. If you are installing fonts from a floppy disk or a CD-ROM, you should make sure this check box is selected. Otherwise, you will have to keep this disk or CD-ROM available to use the fonts in your applications.

Click OK to install the fonts.


Installing PostScript Type 1 Fonts in Windows Me/98/95 or Windows NT

Use ATM (Adobe Type Manager) to install PostScript Type 1 fonts. You can download Adobe’s freely distributable ATM Light for Windows from Adobe’s Web site.


What if I installed my font correctly, but it's not available in my applications?

Some applications need to be restarted for changes to take effect. Restart the application and see if the fonts are available.

Follow the steps below if you do not see fonts in the Font Menu:

  • Scan the entire font menu. The font may not be where you expect it to be. For example, Vivaldi appears as EF Vivaldi.
  • Make sure you have installed the fonts correctly.
  • Close and restart the application. For most applications, if you install a font while it is running, it does not rebuild the font menu to show the new fonts you have added.
  • Restart the computer. It is amazing how often this fixes mysterious problems.
  • Check a simple application such as WordPad. If the font works one of these applications, but not in your primary application, consult the documentation for the primary application. There may be special requirements for font installation.
  • In Windows, if you are using Adobe Type Manager and the font does not appear in an Adobe product, such as Adobe Illustrator or Adobe PhotoShop, search your computer for all copies of the file AdobeFnt.lst by following the steps below:
  • Choose Start > Search (or Find depending on your Windows version) > For Files or Folders to launch the Find utility.
  • Delete all copies of the AdobeFnt.lst file. Adobe applications recreate this file when you restart them.

What if I installed the font, but the wrong font name shows up in the font menu?

You probably got the right font. Many fonts on the Windows platform are arranged into four-style “Windows families” - regular, italic, bold, and bold italic. Sometimes, only the “regular” version will appear in your font menu, even if you only installed the bold or italic version. This is particularly true for bold and black styles. For example, lots of fonts are grouped into light and bold styles as one family, and medium and black styles as another.

Some font packages contain multiple versions of the same font. If you save fonts on your hard disk, the following folders might be created:

<Name> TT, containing TrueType fonts

<Name> PS, containing PostScript fonts

..\Single, containing non-classified single fonts

..\Family, containing classified fonts

If you install fonts from the folders called “Single” or "~s", each style will appear as a separate item in your application’s font menu.

If you install fonts from the folders called “Family” or "~f", styles will be grouped into families. As a result, you may see different names in your application’s font menu. These are family names rather than style names. In any family, you should use the application’s bold or italic style selector to select the appropriate style.

Make sure that you are consistent in picking between family and single versions. Installing both versions, or a mixture of versions from the same family, will cause problems.

MACMAC


How do I unpack a font file?

Mac OS font files are compressed and encoded as either .hqx or .sit files. Usually, your browser will automatically unpack these files after downloading them. By default, these files appear on the Desktop. However, if you have problems unpacking them, you can download StuffIt Expander at no charge. Once you have installed the software, you can extract the files by dragging and dropping the HQX or SIT file onto the StuffIt Expander application (rather than double clicking on the file). This also works with .sea files.


The file I downloaded does not unpack. What do I do?

Make sure you have downloaded the latest version of StuffIt Expander.

The file may not have downloaded properly. Try downloading the font again.


How do I install a font?

If you chose to download the zip file for the font, unpack it and follow the installation directions below to install the fonts onto your system.

We recommend installing only one format of a font, either OpenType, TrueType, or PostScript. Installing two or more formats of the same font may cause problems when you try to use, view, or print the font. If you use a font management utility to manage your fonts, follow the instructions for the utility to install and remove fonts. After installing fonts, you may need to restart an application or reselect the printer in the application to make the fonts appear in the font list.


Installing PostScript, OpenType, or TrueType Fonts in Mac OS X

Before installing fonts, you should close any open applications. For some applications, new fonts do not appear in the font menu if you install them while the application is open.

In the Finder, open the folder or disk that contains the fonts you want to install.

Select the font suitcases for the fonts you want to install. For PostScript Type 1 fonts, select the printer outline files as well.

Drag and drop the fonts into the Fonts folder in the Library folder. If you want fonts to be available to applications running in Classic mode, you must install fonts in Macintosh TrueType or Macintosh PostScript format into the Fonts folder inside the Classic System folder.


Installing PostScript or TrueType Fonts in Mac OS 9.x or 8.x

Macintosh System 9.x allows you to open 512 suitcases at once. Macintosh System 8.x and earlier only allow you to open 128 font suitcases at one time. If you exceed these limits, not all the fonts you install will work.

Before installing fonts, you should close any open applications. For some applications, new fonts do not appear in the font menu if you install them while the application is open.

In the Finder, open the folder or disk that contains the fonts you want to install.

Select the font suitcases for the fonts you want to install. For PostScript Type 1 fonts, select the printer outline files as well.

Drag and drop the fonts onto the closed System Folder icon.

Click OK to install the fonts


What if I installed my font correctly, but it's not available in my applications?

Some applications need to be restarted for changes to take effect. Restart the application and see if the fonts are available.

Follow the steps below if you do not see fonts in the Font Menu:

  • Scan the entire font menu. The font may not be where you expect it to be. For example, Vivaldi appears as EF Vivaldi. Also the order may not be strictly alphabetical; some fonts may appear at the end of the font list.
  • Make sure you have installed the fonts correctly. For Classic, Mac OS 9.x and earlier the font suitcase (and associated PostScript font file if any) must be loose in the Fonts folder. They will not work if they are inside a subfolder.
  • Close and restart the application. For most applications, if you install a font while it is running, it does not rebuild the font menu to show the new fonts you have added.
  • Restart the computer. Very often this fixes mysterious problems.
  • Check a simple application, such as Text Edit - If the font works one of these applications, but not in your primary application, consult the documentation for the primary application. There may be special requirements for font installation.
  • For OpenType fonts on Mac OS 8.x and 9.x, try using Adobe OTF File Typer to correct the file type and creator codes for files with names ending in “.otf”. The utility is available as a free download from Adobe. This utility does not work in Mac OS X.

What if I installed the font, but the wrong font name shows up in the font menu?

You probably got the right font. Many fonts on the Mac are arranged into “Macintosh familes”, regular, italic, bold, and bold italic. Sometimes, only the “regular” version will appear in your font menu, even if you only installed the bold or italic version. This is particularly true for bold and black styles. For example, lots of fonts are grouped into light and bold styles as one family, and medium and black styles as another.

Some font packages contain multiple versions of the same font. If you save fonts on your hard disk, the following folders might be created:

<Name> TT, containing TrueType fonts

<Name> PS, containing PostScript fonts

..\Single, containing non-classified single fonts

..\Family, containing classified fonts

If you install fonts from the folders called “Single” or "~s", each style will appear as a separate item in your application’s font menu.

If you install fonts from the folders called “Family” or "~f", styles will be grouped into families. As a result, you may see different names in your application’s font menu. These are family names rather than style names. In any family, you should use the application’s bold or italic style selector to select the appropriate style.

Make sure that you are consistent in picking between family and single versions. Installing both versions, or a mixture of versions from the same family, will cause problems.

On Mac OS

One subtlety with Macintosh families is that PostScript Type 1 fonts are usually handled by a single bitmap suitcase that contains up to four styles. This results in two additional possibilities:

If you install one style as a family, you get pixilated fonts for styles you didn't buy.

If you install several family fonts from the same family, the bitmap suitcases are identical. As a result, they overwrite each other when copying them into the Fonts folder. This is intentional. However, if you have any applications open, you can't overwrite bitmap suitcases in the Fonts folder.